Tag: Indian clubs

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We have been getting a few inquiries lately about how to combine club swinging with other strength training modalities, such as barbells and kettlebells.

Since we have different club swinging programs available (including the latest Hanuman workout volume 5), here is some practical advice.

Prioritize your training goals

What do you want to achieve? What is most important for you? A bigger deadlift? 100 reps unbroken meel swings with heavy clubs? Learning new complex exercises? Better cardio?

Have a good think about it all, and put your goals in a numeric order, with #1 being the most important one for now.
Once you have your list, time to plan for the goals you chose. For the next 8-12 weeks, focus on #1 and #2, including them in your program each time you train.
Add goals #3-5 here and there on occasion, when you feel you have time and energy.
Disregard anything over #5.
That’s it, keep at it for 8-12 weeks. After that, you may write a new list, or carry on.

Depending on how many days you can train, and how much time you have each session, you could structure your week in many ways. Here are 2 simple ways.

Option 1 | Training 3 times a week

Use the classical heavy, light, medium day approach mentionned in Bill Starr’s book ”The strong shall survive”.

Kettlebell/ barbell strength training x20-30 min. Pick 3-5 lifts.

Follow up with:
Club
swinging x10-15 minutes (Meels 101 on heavy day, light clubs on light day, Hanuman workout series on medium day)

Option 2 | Training 5 days a week

Day 1, 3: Hanuman program, using the variability table included in the program.

Day 2, 4: Strength training with barbell/ kettlebells x20-30 min followed by some of the exercises in Meels 101 for 5-10 min.

Day 5: Kettlebells/ bodyweight training x15-20 min, followed by light double club swinging x5-10 min

Is it the perfect solution or program?

Don’t overthink it too much. Get going first, and tweak the program along the way. Too many people want the perfect program, without having a perfect lifestyle to begin with. Take the first step!

How you pick exercises and rep scheme depends on your personal goals, and equipment available.
Heavy weights are lifted for a low reps (3-5), while lighter weights are lifted for higher reps (6-10 or 10-20)

One of the principles I follow most of the time is not to train to fatigue, as the old texts mention. If you have read some books by Pavel, you’ll be familiar with the concept too.

Examples of how I personally combine things

Since the lockdown, I stopped training for kettlebell marathon competition. Therefore my training does not have to be 100% focused as earlier. I want to feel good, and have energy to do the things I have to do , play with my kids and so on.

I aim to get as much movement variation as possible on a daily basis.
By that, I mean I push, pull in different directions, raise my center of gravity, rotate, move laterally and backwards, crawl on all four, make use of uneven terrain, i
nclude single leg exercises etc…

Here are 6 examples for inspiration.

Option #1

EMM circuit: Every minute on the minute. Perform the exercises, and rest the remainder of the minute. Set a time limit to the circuit, 20-30 minutes is usually plenty.

  • min 1: 20x jump rope cross over, 2x kettlebell jump squats, x1/1 one arm push up, x1 ring pull up
  • min 2: 20x full swing with thick grip club (left hand)
  • min 3: 20x jump rope cross over, 2x kettlebell jump squats, x1/1 one arm push up, x1 ring pull up
  • min 4: 20x full swing with thick grip club (left hand)
  • etc… until the time is up

Option #2

Strength circuit: use the correct weight to stay within the desired rep range.

  • Turkish get up x1/1
  • Sumo Deadlift x6
    1 arm row with thick grip x6-10/6-10
  • Single seated calf raise x12-15/12-15
  • Neurogrip push ups x6-10
  • Light clubs x1 min
  • Rest as needed, do 3-5 work sets.

Finish with ab roller, and static lunge holds

Option #3

AMRAP: As Many Rounds As Possible within a defined time limit, 20-30 minutes.

  • Push up complex
  • Meels complex
  • Kettlebell get up 

Repeat the sequence for time, resting as needed.

 

Option #4

Pavel’s ”Simple and sinister” (kettlebell swings and Turkish get ups), using a single heavy club for 5-15 min at the end

Option #5

Pavel’s ”The quick and the dead” (kettlebell swings/ snatch and explosive push ups), using 2 light clubs as active recovery between exercises.

Option #6

Contrast intervals: One hard interval followed by an easy one to provide active recovery, targeting different movement patterns.

  • Fast pace kettlebell snatch or 1 arm long cycle x4 minutes
  • Slow/ easy paced circuit with bodyweight and clubs x3 min
  • Repeat 4 times

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Let me introduce our Canadian ambassador, Mark Robson, who runs a fitness studio called MeFirstFitness in Toronto. At Mefirstfitness, the instructor crew specializes in group fitness with 45 classes a week, one on one personal training and weight loss challenges. 

Mark has a background in sports such as Hockey, Martial Arts,  Volleyball, and a host of certifications from Personal trainer, kettlebell, steel mace and Heroic Sport level 1 instructor.

Let’s hear about Indian clubs and group classes!

How, why and when did you get started with Indian clubs?

I started training with Indian Clubs about 3 years ago. The past 2 years much more seriously due to reoccurring rotator cuff tears.

What kind of clubs do you prefer to swing?

I swing all styles of clubs. I love to swing heavy for sheer power and strength. I like smaller clubs for injury prevention, warmup and rhythm/dance. I also like clubs in between for endurance and cardio.

What is it you specifically enjoy about club swinging?

It doesn’t feel like exercise to me. I love to put on my favourite music and swing for hours. No two workouts are ever the same.

What do you see as the main advantage of lifting odd unbalanced objects versus conventional weights?

I feel its more functional and practical to real life movements and situations. I also feel like I get a better full body workout.

What are the benefits of club swinging for your clients in your opinion?

I do a lot of club swinging with clients for warm ups and to help increase their range of motion (mostly at the shoulder girdle). Clients are also less familiar with them than dumbbells so they find it to be a little more fun when used for more traditional exercises.

How easy/ hard was it to get your clients sold on the idea of swinging clubs?

It depends on what and how you teach them. Most feel the benefits of the light clubs immediately and often ask me if we can start our workouts with them.

For someone wanting to improve athleticism and well being, is swinging clubs enough? What are some great complementary activities to club swinging?

I never like to limit myself or my clients to just one type of training. The obvious answer to this question would be body weight exercises but I also am adamant about adding cardio as well as some power lifting and kettlebell training to all my clients routines. This provides a good combination of endurance, strength and power to your workouts.

What do you like about the Pahlavandle and XL, compared to other types of clubs on the market?

The biggest benefit for most people getting started is the price. The pahlavandles are the most affordable clubs on the market today. In addition you can take them anywhere you go and they are adjustable in weight based on the size of the bottle you use and the filler. Same could be said for the XL. In addition the shipping costs from Heroic Sport are incredible. You won’t pay cheaper shipping anywhere in the world!

Do you use the Pahlavandle in your classes or workshops? How do people react the first time you show them a plastic handle?

Yes, totally! They react no differently than they would to a regular set of wooden clubs. Most wouldn’t know the difference, plus the Pahlavandle swings virtually the exact same way as a wooden club, so even experienced users wouldn’t notice a difference.

What advice can you give to people just starting up?

Find a coach, take a course or get yourself some online videos to study. You need to start with the very basic circles and moves. Practicing is the only way to get better.

Do you have a favorite template to structure a training session?

I’m not a fan of structure personally as I get bored rather easy. But when teaching clubs I like to start with one move before adding another and building to more complex sequences as we go.

1 thing people wouldn’t know about you?

I’m also a musician, comic book lover and avid gamer.

Anything you wish to add?

I’m very happy Thierry asked to interview me for this Blog and I am a proud Ambassador for Heroic Sport. Reach out to me if you want, as I would love to share my passion for everything Club related with you! Cheers and keep swinging!

You can get in touch with Mark through his facebook and instagram pages, or head to his site.

 

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This Christmas, join us for 4 exciting Indian clubs workouts every Advent Sunday! It’s our little thank you for your continued support and feedback. The videos will be taken down in 2020, but you’ll get the chance to purchase them at a ridiculous low price!

Thierry is combining Indian clubs with kettlebells, bodyweight and even sandbag exercises.
Just follow along and get a great  full body workout in under 30 minutes.

Remember to use the appropriate weight for each exercise, and be ready to substitute exercises if you’re unsure about how to perform them! 

Have the best and merriest Christmas, and scroll below for a 50% discount promo code!

SUBSCRIBE to our channel to get reminders about the coming videos!

Advent workout 1: Single kettlebell complex and 2 light Indian clubs

Advent workout 2: Interval workout with a single kettlebell and single heavy club

Advent workout 3: Circuit with shena complex, Meel complex and double kettlebell complex

Advent workout 4: Dangal AMRAP circuit with bodyweight, heavy club, kettlebells and sandbag

IMPROVE YOUR INDIAN CLUBS TECHNIQUE

Our tutorials are very detailed, filmed from different angles, slow-mo where necessary, and we break down complex moves into smaller chunks. They are different from what we share on social medias, and also organized in a progressive way, making it easy to assimilate the complexity of Indian clubs.

Take advantage of our special offer this December. From GET STARTED VIDEOS (which are sorted in themes) or COMBINATION SWINGS AND CIRCUITS, there is something for all levels!

The offer does not apply to items on sale.

Ron says ho ho ho, swing your pahlavandle!

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Ankle injuries are one of the most common orthopedic causes of an emergency room visit. 

Sometimes after an injury, your body awareness system stops working properly, and you may need to do some specific balance exercises to re-teach your body what it needs to do.

In this blog post, we show you some simple and effective exercises you can do with Indian clubs in the context of rehab, and even prehab. Just make sure to have the go-ahead with your physician before you start!

Ankle rehab

The goals of ankle rehab usually are:

  • Restore normal ankle mobility/ range of motion (ROM) 
  • Improve muscular strength and stability around the ankle
  • Restore normal balance and proprioception to your entire lower extremity

Proprioception is your body’s ability to realize where it is in space. This body awareness is an important component of human movement, as it helps us to move fluidly and easily without having to consciously think about the forces (like gravity) that are acting upon us. 

Indian clubs exercises target the lower body too!

The great thing about Indian clubs is that most of the benefits are reactive or happen on a reflexive level, meaning that you do not have to think about them. The clubs try to pull you off balance, and you automatically correct your posture to avoid loosing it.

The first exercise helps regain ankle range of motion, the second one helps with balance and proprioception.

More balance exercises for your ankle stability

After you have tried those 2 exercises, you can move on to more challenging balance board exercises as shown below. 

No need for fancy equipment to make a simple balance board, be creative as we demonstrate in the video. Use zig zags and elevate the boards slightly instead of leaving them flat. Don’t go crazy though, make it interesting but safe!

If you want state of the art balance board, we have the Strobel and Walter yogaboard in stock. You can get the effect of training on water or snow right in your home fitness training space.

If it sounds like too much of a hassle, or you don’t have room, simply go outdoors and walk on uneven terrain (like sand and hills), barefooted if possible. This will build up strength and mobility too.

Release tight calves to improve  ankle mobility, posture and range of motion

A 2015 study by Škarabot et al compared the effects of self myofascial release (SMR: a fancy term for auto massage) versus static stretching alone. 
The results showed that range of motion at that ankle increased by 9.1% when SMR was performed along with a static stretching routine.
Athletes performing static strecthing alone only reported a 6.2% improvement.

Just about everybody reports tight calves. One of the reasons is that our ankles and feet are rarely challenged through their entire range of motion in our day to day lives. We walk on perfectly flat (and hard) surfaces, and spend way too much time in shoes constricting our feet.

We show you a way to use your Pahlavandle™ as a self massage tool, how to stretch your calves, and ways you can assess your improvement in range of motion.

Better ankle mobility might also help you sit deeper in a squat, so get rolling and swinging!

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