Category: Indian clubs

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Let me introduce our Canadian ambassador, Mark Robson, who runs a fitness studio called MeFirstFitness in Toronto. At Mefirstfitness, the instructor crew specializes in group fitness with 45 classes a week, one on one personal training and weight loss challenges. 

Mark has a background in sports such as Hockey, Martial Arts,  Volleyball, and a host of certifications from Personal trainer, kettlebell, steel mace and Heroic Sport level 1 instructor.

Let’s hear about Indian clubs and group classes!

How, why and when did you get started with Indian clubs?

I started training with Indian Clubs about 3 years ago. The past 2 years much more seriously due to reoccurring rotator cuff tears.

What kind of clubs do you prefer to swing?

I swing all styles of clubs. I love to swing heavy for sheer power and strength. I like smaller clubs for injury prevention, warmup and rhythm/dance. I also like clubs in between for endurance and cardio.

What is it you specifically enjoy about club swinging?

It doesn’t feel like exercise to me. I love to put on my favourite music and swing for hours. No two workouts are ever the same.

What do you see as the main advantage of lifting odd unbalanced objects versus conventional weights?

I feel its more functional and practical to real life movements and situations. I also feel like I get a better full body workout.

What are the benefits of club swinging for your clients in your opinion?

I do a lot of club swinging with clients for warm ups and to help increase their range of motion (mostly at the shoulder girdle). Clients are also less familiar with them than dumbbells so they find it to be a little more fun when used for more traditional exercises.

How easy/ hard was it to get your clients sold on the idea of swinging clubs?

It depends on what and how you teach them. Most feel the benefits of the light clubs immediately and often ask me if we can start our workouts with them.

For someone wanting to improve athleticism and well being, is swinging clubs enough? What are some great complementary activities to club swinging?

I never like to limit myself or my clients to just one type of training. The obvious answer to this question would be body weight exercises but I also am adamant about adding cardio as well as some power lifting and kettlebell training to all my clients routines. This provides a good combination of endurance, strength and power to your workouts.

What do you like about the Pahlavandle and XL, compared to other types of clubs on the market?

The biggest benefit for most people getting started is the price. The pahlavandles are the most affordable clubs on the market today. In addition you can take them anywhere you go and they are adjustable in weight based on the size of the bottle you use and the filler. Same could be said for the XL. In addition the shipping costs from Heroic Sport are incredible. You won’t pay cheaper shipping anywhere in the world!

Do you use the Pahlavandle in your classes or workshops? How do people react the first time you show them a plastic handle?

Yes, totally! They react no differently than they would to a regular set of wooden clubs. Most wouldn’t know the difference, plus the Pahlavandle swings virtually the exact same way as a wooden club, so even experienced users wouldn’t notice a difference.

What advice can you give to people just starting up?

Find a coach, take a course or get yourself some online videos to study. You need to start with the very basic circles and moves. Practicing is the only way to get better.

Do you have a favorite template to structure a training session?

I’m not a fan of structure personally as I get bored rather easy. But when teaching clubs I like to start with one move before adding another and building to more complex sequences as we go.

1 thing people wouldn’t know about you?

I’m also a musician, comic book lover and avid gamer.

Anything you wish to add?

I’m very happy Thierry asked to interview me for this Blog and I am a proud Ambassador for Heroic Sport. Reach out to me if you want, as I would love to share my passion for everything Club related with you! Cheers and keep swinging!

You can get in touch with Mark through his facebook and instagram pages, or head to his site.

 

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Heavy Indian club exercises. What do you picture in your mind as you read this? Probably a scene from the Persian Zurkhaneh, or the Indian Akhara, where swinging 2 large meels or joris are performed. 

Is swinging with both hands on a single Indian club traditional?

In the club swinging community, swinging a single club is mainly thought as not traditional, often associated with clubbells and other steel clubs.  I have even read comments on social medias saying that swinging with 2 hands on a club is wrong. Yet, those same people swing gadas and other type of maces with 2 hands… But I digress.

Swinging a heavy single club, with 1 hand or 2 hands, is even found in the English literature of the 19th century, when Indian clubs made their way to Europe. This style of club swinging is as legitimate and ancient as any!

In India, swinging a single club appears to be more common place the more one travels South. The design of the clubs also change from a conic shape reminiscent of the Persian meel to a straighter log shape. The handle on these clubs is typically 8-9 inches, providing room for double handed grips without having to interlock fingers.

In Tamil culture, there are 6 different types of Indian clubs known as Karlakattai, each with their specific functions.

Why you should incorporate single heavy Indian club exercises in your current training

Swinging a pair of heavy, bulky and long clubs severely limits the range of exercises you can do with them. While back circles are great, they can rapidly become tedious…
By contrast, swinging a single heavy club offers a myriad of possibilities, and also way more options of integrate footwork and lower body exercises.

Reason 1

heavy indian club exercises by warmanYou should start by swinging a single Indian club because it is simpler to coordinate, and therefore faster to learn. By switching grips and avoiding fatigue, you can also maintain your heart rate elevated to get the benefits of cardiovascular fitness.

That’s the main reason why our level 1 online certification covers only single club swinging. It really is the foundation necessary to perform complex double club swings in the long run.

Reason 2

heavy indian club exercises -dick'sYou can swing heavier clubs from the start. While the European systems of double club swinging often recommended 1,2kg clubs as the first weight for men, the typical starting weight for mugdars and karlakattais would be 3-5kg.

You can guess that the physical adaptations and physiques resulting form training with light clubs would be different from the heavy clubs.
As long as you slowly build up volume in a progressive way, there is no reason to think you’d be more likely to injure yourself with a single heavier club.

Proponents of heavy Indian club exercises such as Sam D.Kehoe and Professor Harrison, were rather opinionated on the matter, thinking light clubs a good form of exercises for children and geriatrics. At Heroic Sport, we however think there are many benefits to also swing light clubs!

Reason 3

As many of the heavy single Indian club exercises are based on fighting techniques, many of the swings also make use the diagonal and horizontal cutting lines, which are often times neglected by club swingers.

As we know, variability is essential to human development and health, and movement variability ensures you do not neglect movement patterns.

Heavy Indian club exercises inspiration

To that purpose, we have created a series of heavy single Indian club exercises, which progressively become more complex and challenging in each volume. It’s been planned for the beginner in mind, but anyone will be able to train at their own abilities and enjoy a great workout.

If you haven’t checked out our Hanuman workouts yet, you’re in a for a treat, as we designed a whole 4-6 week training cycle template, including one for instructors running classes or bootcamps. The whole work is cut out for you, just warm up and hit play!

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Do you know the zercher squat? If you’re into strength, health and longevity, at one point or another, you might want to consider adding loaded squats to your club swinging routine.

Research shows that using the legs, particularly in weight-bearing exercise, sends signals to the brain that are vital for the production of healthy neural cells.

According to studies from King’s College of London, there’s a specific link between strong legs and a strong mind. The conclusions show that subjects with the greater leg power  experienced less cognitive decline over a 10-year period, and overall aged better cognitively.

A little historical perspective…

Historians have found references to feats of strength and weight lifting competitions dating as far back as the 3600 BC. Strength was not merely an object of vanity but instead something of considerable societal importance.

Military recruits in ancient China were required to pass specific strength tests before they were allowed to join.

As mentioned in previous blog posts, no warrior or athlete swung Indian clubs exclusively.

Tamil, Hindu and Persian club swingers also lifted weights in one form or another, and worked on all around strength and fitness, as their physical training system was martial in nature. Wrestling and fighting was just part of their daily life.

The legendary wrestler known as the great Gama, performed thousands of squats daily with stone neck rings (Gar-nal), and pushed all his might against trees, in an effort to uproot them.

Even in Europe, back in the 1800’s, Indian clubs were a complimentary discipline to gymnastics, weight training, boxing and fencing. 

Squat progressions

All leg exercises are great, and in our videos we show you many ways to integrate the lower body with Indian clubs. But usually the loading parameters fall more into the endurance spectrum of strength, rather than pure strength.

The good thing is that any type of squatting is better than no squatting, and will improve your hip mobility, which is so important for ageing well.

When it comes to strength, you need a load  heavy enough to provide the right stimulus. Bodyweight squats are a great way to start and practice form, but when you can easily do 15-25 reps non stop, you need to start adding weight.

How heavy?

As a general rule, if you can’t do 6 reps, the weight is too heavy, but if you can do more than 12, the weight is too light. Rest 1-2 minutes and perform a few sets. 

I do not advocate you to start becoming a squat specialist and think you need to squat double bodyweight  or as heavy as possible to get the benefits of loaded squats.  

If you’re over 40, and are not looking at setting any records, focus on form over load. One “heavy” squat session a week is enough, but keep squatting and lunging the other days, using light weight. Basically do it often with a light  weight, not so often with a heavy weight.

The next step after bodyweight squats are Goblet squats. For these, you will need either a dumbbell or kettlebell, and watch our tutorial.

As you get stronger, you might need something heavier, like a barbell or a sandbag. We show you how cheap and easy it is to make your own sandbags further down!

Doing heavy squats with a barbell typically requires you to either:

  • have a squat rack
  • know how to clean the barbell off the ground and perform front squats

This is where the Zercher squat comes in

The Zercher squat is an exercise named after St. Louis strongman Ed Zercher. Back in these days (1930-40), not many gyms had a squat rack. You could call it the kettlebell goblet squat’s grandfather or strong uncle…

The video below shows you how to safely perform it.

I recommend wearing some elbow sleeves, and stance of course, is a matter of personal preference. I demonstrate the zercher squat with a wide stance. Some people might favor a narrow stance with elbow outside the knees.

For the fans of physical culture history, the Zercher lift had become a sanctioned USAWA lift in the 1960s. At 156 lbs bodyweight, some of Ed Zercher lifts included:

  • One Hand Snatch 120 lbs.
  • One Hand Clean & Jerk 130 lbs.
  • Two Hand Military Press 170 lbs.
  • Two Hand Snatch 145 lbs.
  • Two Hand Clean & Jerk 200 lbs.

Picking up something heavy from the floor and standing up with it is fantastic to strengthen your whole body.
Squatting with the load in front on the body rather than on the shoulders has some hidden benefits too. Many people struggle with balance (often falling back) and squat depth. 

In the Goblet and Zercher squats, the weight being in front of the body helps you maintain balance over your stance. At the same time, they also challenge the lower back to remain upright and prevent the torso from falling forward. 

From experience, this allows people to squat deeper with better form, especially if you follow our tips on increasing ankle mobility.

The barbell Zercher squat is one of the exercise from “Kettlebell Strong” our 12 week kettlebell and barbell program for the intermediate lifter.

Protect your back

When lifting heavy weight, we have to create a virtual corset that braces and protects our spine.

This is radically different to the type of breathing we use when swinging Indian clubs.

In the video, I explain as clearly and simply as possible the concepts of rich anchoring and virtual corset.

The rib anchor helps prevent the lower back from arching, and putting stress on the spine. The virtual corset protects the back from compression — weight-bearing, impact, and vibration, as well as any distortion in shape like arching, rounding, or twisting. 

Make your own sandbag and learn how to lift it

Not everyone has access to a barbell. Sandbags are great, and the beauty is you do not need anything fancy to be effective! 
Oh, and they cost next to nothing to make…

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This Christmas, join us for 4 exciting Indian clubs workouts every Advent Sunday! It’s our little thank you for your continued support and feedback. The videos will be taken down in 2020, but you’ll get the chance to purchase them at a ridiculous low price!

Thierry is combining Indian clubs with kettlebells, bodyweight and even sandbag exercises.
Just follow along and get a great  full body workout in under 30 minutes.

Remember to use the appropriate weight for each exercise, and be ready to substitute exercises if you’re unsure about how to perform them! 

Have the best and merriest Christmas, and scroll below for a 50% discount promo code!

SUBSCRIBE to our channel to get reminders about the coming videos!

Advent workout 1: Single kettlebell complex and 2 light Indian clubs

Advent workout 2: Interval workout with a single kettlebell and single heavy club

Advent workout 3: Circuit with shena complex, Meel complex and double kettlebell complex

Advent workout 4: Dangal AMRAP circuit with bodyweight, heavy club, kettlebells and sandbag

IMPROVE YOUR INDIAN CLUBS TECHNIQUE

Our tutorials are very detailed, filmed from different angles, slow-mo where necessary, and we break down complex moves into smaller chunks. They are different from what we share on social medias, and also organized in a progressive way, making it easy to assimilate the complexity of Indian clubs.

Take advantage of our special offer this December. From GET STARTED VIDEOS (which are sorted in themes) or COMBINATION SWINGS AND CIRCUITS, there is something for all levels!

The offer does not apply to items on sale.

Ron says ho ho ho, swing your pahlavandle!

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